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Back to School Advice

Back to school can be a stressful time for students and parents, alike. New routines, earlier bedtimes, homework and long bus rides can make these first few weeks of September especially challenging.


Helping children prepare can help get the start of the school year off to the right start.


1. Re-establish a routine


The long days of summer naturally lend themselves to less structure and a more relaxed schedule. However, having consistent routines will help your child to feel a sense of security and control, and can alleviate some feelings of anxiety. It is never too late to re-establish a routine with your child. Find time to sit down as a family to establish a morning routine, after school transition routine, and bedtime routine.



2. Establish healthy habits


Healthy habits go hand in hand with a healthy daily routine. The importance of a good night’s sleep, a healthy diet and a regular dose of exercise cannot be understated. When our physical needs are met, we are better able to cope with the challenges and obstacles of everyday life.


3. Limit screen time


When establishing a routine, it can also be helpful to address limits around screen time. This could include strategies such as designating areas of the house a “no-screen zone” (e.g., bedrooms, kitchen table) and placing parental locks on all devices. Remember to limit screens an hour or two before bedtime.


4.Encourage independence


Getting your children involved with the preparation for the school day can help provide them with a sense of control. All family members have household responsibilities and it is never to early to start encouraging this independence. Younger children can wash fruit for their lunch or pick out their clothes the night before, while older children may be able to plan and prepare their entire school lunch and organize their school supplies.


5. Calm back to school fears


It is normal for children to feel nervous about the first few days of school. You may find that your child clings to you at drop off, begins to cry, or complains about a stomach-ache or headache. Validating what your child is feeling while reinforcing your expectations can be a powerful tool. For example you might say, “I can see how worried you are about going to school today but it is important that you go to class. I will be here when school is over and I can’t wait to hear all about your day”.


6. Celebrate the beginning of the school year


Emphasize all of the positives about starting the new school year – a chance to see old friends, meet new ones, and learn new things. Creating a positive mindset helps us to find the good in each day and focus on what makes us happy. Children pick up on their parents’ emotions, and if you express fear about the start of school your child may begin to feel as if they should be afraid too.